Coca-Cola is planning to launch a alcoholic drink for the first time of companies 125-years history – with an alcopop-style product in Japan.

It is quick to take advantage of the nation’s developing taste for Chu-Hi – canned sparkling flavored drinks given a kick with a local spirit called shochu.

The product is typically between of 3% and 8% liquor by volume.

A senior Coke executive in Japan said the move was an “modest experiment for a particular slice of our market”.

We haven’t experimented in the low alcohol category before, but it’s an example of how we continue to explore opportunities outside our core areas,” said Jorge Garduno, Coca-Cola’s Japan president.

It was unlikely the drink would be sold outside of Japan, he recommended.


Chu-Hi – a abbreviation for shochu highball – has been promoted as an other option to lager, demonstrating particularly prevalent with female consumers.

Japan’s big drinking firms including Kirin, Suntory and Asahi all have varieties of the drink, and keep on experimenting with flavors.

The most mainstream flavors are solid citrus ones, for example, grapefruit or lemon, yet the drink can likewise be made with other organic product flavors like grape, apple and peach.

As more younger consumers turn out to be more health conscious, Coca-Cola has been diversifying from fizzy drinks including purchasing water and tea brands.

In any case, last November, Wells Fargo examiner Bonnie Herzog theorized that Coca-Cola may move into liquor, as it looked to “premium segments, for example, adult craft beverages”.

The expression alcopop commonly alludes to sweet yet mixed beverages, and in 1990s UK brands, for example, Hooch, Reef, Smirnoff Ice and Bacardi Breezer turned out to be colossally mainstream.

Yet, they were disputable. raising worries that they urged youngsters to drink alcohol substantial amounts since they were so natural to expend.

Load More Related Articles
Load More By Lakshya Kumar
Load More In Business

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Check Also

IBM reveals world’s smallest computer

Tech giant IBM has disclosed the world’s smallest computer estimating 1 x 1 mm. This…